“Facebook 1940” New Mexico Latinas

Two young Latinas pose for their portraits in July 1940 in Chamisal, New Mexico.  New Mexico was home to the Pueblo nations for thousands of years, and many citizens still speak their Uto-Aztec languages. The Spanish were the first European settlers in New Mexico, and began surveying and mapping the state in 1539.  New Mexico was next part of the nation of Mexico, and joined the Union as a state in The photos were taken as part of an extensive pictorial record of American life between 1935 and 1944 by the Office of War Information Photograph Collection, For more photos, please visit our country’s original book of faces at the Library of Congress, www.LOC.gov.

Life in America: A Latinos Life Between 1935 and 1944

Hispanic Americans dance at a traditional festival in Taos, New Mexico, in July 1940.  Russell Lee, a photographer for the Office of War Information Photograph Collection, snapped their photos as part of an extensive pictorial record of American life between 1935 and 1944.  The Taos region was initially settled by the Native American nations; in 1615 the city was christened as Fernandez de Taos by the Spanish.  For more photos, please visit our country’s first face book at the Library of Congress, www.LOC.gov.

 

Latino Children in the War Information Photograph Collection

A young Latino boy poses for the Office of War Information Photograph Collection in Chamisal, New Mexico.  The photos were taken as part of an extensive pictorial record of American life between 1935 and 1944.  For more photos, please visit our country’s book of faces at the Library of Congress, www.LOC.gov.

Hispanics during the Great Depression

Long before Facebook photos were posted willingly or images were taken covertly by the NSA, North Americans happily posed for photographers from the Office of War Information Photograph Collection.  The photos were taken as part of an extensive pictorial record of American life between 1935 and 1944, including the latter years of the Great Depression – Dorothea Lange’s iconic photo of the “Migrant Mother”, taken in 1936, is among them.  Latinos also participated in the national program.  The charming children of a Hispanic-American farmer in Amalia, New Mexico posed for this snapshot.  For more photos, please visit our country’s first face book at the Library of Congress, www.LOC.gov.

Happy Birthday To Oralia Lillie Corrales

Happy Birthday to Oralia Lillie Corrales, who began her triumphant, generous and difficult journey in the world on July 5, 1940 in Midland, Texas. Corrales was a child farm worker, spending her early summers in the fields of California picking cotton, potatoes, grapes, and peaches.  She and her family traveled from one migrant camp to another, as her mother worked to support 16 children.  Corrales recalled having one school dress that she washed and ironed every day; her inspiration was a good-hearted teacher who complimented her on her appearance.  Corrales is now a community activist and successful businesswoman, while raising her own large family that includes her four children, two children of her deceased sister’s, and seven of her mother’s.  Corrales is an active member of LULAC (League of United Latin American Citizens) and was named Woman of the Year by Hispanic Magazine in 1986.